The Active Network
ActiveWin Anonymous | Create a User | Reviews | News | Forums | Advertise | Career Portal | Users Online: 571  
 

Recommended Links: Computer Accessories

Wedding Dresses Cheap

Prom Dresses

Gear Best

An onlineWriting University for college students

Essaypartner.net - your free resource for essay writing help.

neowin.net

Amazon.com Eternicom

  *  

  Microsoft sabotaging GPL, claims Samba
Time: 03:40 EST/08:40 GMT | News Source: WinBeta | Posted By: Kenneth van Surksum

Samba project leader Jeremy Allison has accused Microsoft of trying to prevent people using and distributing software under the GNU General Public Licence, by forcing cross-patent licensing deals.

Write Comment
Return to News

  Displaying Comments 1 through 6 of 6
  The time now is 9:31:24 PM ET.
Any comment problems or spammers? E-mail us
Spammers: Your posts will be deleted - do not waste your time!
#1 By Latch (3610 Posts) at 3/11/2009 8:31:14 AM
That doesn't sound like the Microsoft I know. The Microsoft I know is all about interoperability and innovation instead of litigation.

#2 By NotParkerToo (705 Posts) at 3/11/2009 10:07:49 AM
There always somebody who wants everything for free. They never want to pay a fair price for a companies intellectual property.

#3 By MrHumpty (277 Posts) at 3/11/2009 1:20:16 PM
Latch:
I'm not saying I've followed this TomTom File system lawsuit closely. But honestly wth does interoperabilty and innovation have to do with a system using an unlicensed technology of somebody elses? MS holds the patent on that filesystem and others. Tomtom is *choosing* to use that filesystem over others that are available to them. They have plenty of other options... no gun was put to their head.

I guess MS should just give them a pass because they are using Linux... You know I heard it is the year of Linux and it is about to unseat MS on desktops and servers.

What I find funny is MS's filesystems are consistantly called "inferior" by the open source community.

This post was edited by MrHumpty on Wednesday, March 11, 2009 at 13:21.

#4 By Latch (3610 Posts) at 3/11/2009 2:41:06 PM
#3: But honestly wth does interoperabilty and innovation have to do with a system using an unlicensed technology of somebody elses?

If MS is so concerned about interoperability (as their marketing people have been shouting that they are for the past year), why are they now directly impeding it in this one specific case?

I guess MS should just give them a pass because they are using Linux...

No, they should give them a pass for the same reason they give the rest of the entire world that uses FAT a pass. Where's suit against every USB flash drive vendor out there? Where's the suit against IBM and every other vendor that ships a Linux kernel with VFAT? I don't believe for a second that MS has tons of companies licensing this patent. I hate it when this happens: entity gets patent for something but doesn't assert it. Then everyone starts using the thing they patented. Years later, after the thing is ubiquitous, entity suddenly starts making noise about patent licensing. Isn't that what a submarine patent is, and aren't those generally used by patent trolls? Plus, there's a very good chance that the patent wouldn't survive inspection after the Bilski decision (and that patent was already revoked once), and maybe that's why MS is pounding on a shrimp like TomTom while lying through their teeth that it isn't about Linux?

You know I heard it is the year of Linux and it is about to unseat MS on desktops and servers.

Then you've been listening to idiots.

What I find funny is MS's filesystems are consistantly called "inferior" by the open source community.

I'm fairly well-read on the FOSS front, and I don't remember "consistently" reading anything about NTFS being inferior to anything else. Links? FAT had obvious limitations that were addressed by a hack, but when it comes to file systems, your usage patterns can determine which is best.

#5 By NotParkerToo (705 Posts) at 3/11/2009 4:53:56 PM
"Where's suit against every USB flash drive vendor out there?"

Most (if not all) already pay a license fee or have cross-licensing deals with Microsoft that trades rights to each others patents.

#6 By lketchum (3301 Posts) at 3/11/2009 5:26:43 PM
NotParkerToo is quite correct - cross licensing - especially from MS, is quite easy and shockingly affordable. This is especially true among storage vendors - Seagate's CEO for example, most precisely defines what they do as deliver products - when pressed opposite flash drive manufacturers who are engaged in willful patent violations.

He stated something to the effect that all of those in his space, routinely cross license technology from one another. He regarded it as no big deal and that each was and had been doing it for many years.

Write Comment
Return to News
  Displaying Comments 1 through 6 of 6
  The time now is 9:31:24 PM ET.
Any comment problems or spammers? E-mail us
Spammers: Your posts will be deleted - do not waste your time!
Please Enter Your User name and password:

Sign Up For A User Name

 

  *  
  *   *